Careers In Operations Management Field

Careers In Operations Management Field


Careers in operations management field

One of the best aspects of a career in operations management is the ability to work in many diverse jobs. Entry level personnel can usually branch out into one of the broad range of departments available in any large company. From buying to selling to maintaining a plant, the work is rewarding.

Companies today might have locations in any country in the world. These offices and plants need tight communications and management. While the means to achieve that change with technology, the purpose remains the same: to better prepare and execute plans for the financial and social success of the company.

Everyone is aware that companies must succeed financially. They simply can’t exist without making money. However, today’s corporation is finding it more and more necessary to be a better citizen of the world. Green and sustainable resources are grabbing more of the headlines, and social media make these headlines, good or bad, instantly available around the world. A company that can help produce its own electricity, for example, will have an instant publicity opportunity.

The operations manager can be involved in these kinds of exciting advancements. It’s been reported for decades that younger graduates of bachelor programs in the United States consider manufacturing an unlikely career because “there is nothing exciting about it.” That is just not consistent with the facts, since manufacturing operations have never been more high tech or worldwide. Travel is must for the operations executive today.

An operations manager also has the opportunity to hire a team and determine the direction of management decisions. Most big companies have specialists in operations. This means an employee can often choose a location and a specialty that, after gaining experience in manufacturing basics, will be a career choice for life. As continuing education changes, operations people can also take courses toward masters or doctorate programs online. The ,major arguments against manufacturing executive work – they are dull and old-fashioned — are quickly disproven.

Executives in company plants become involved in their communities, promoting the business, helping a charity or organizing a sports league. The plant is generally a major regional employer. The economic well-being of a city or town is affected by the decisions an operations manager makes.

Every executive has the opportunity to learn. Most companies encourage their employees to move up through formal programs, and many pay all or part of the tuition. Nobody can predict the future, but chances are the managers who keep learning and become more culture oriented will be the strongest leaders. To learn more about career in operations management here is a link to our recent article on MBA and its effect on earnings vs experience.

 

Kriss Williams

Operations Manager.com Education Specialist